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of knowledge on lincoln or george washington? pretty much everything that could be written about linking -- lincoln or washington probably has been written. the rate historians whose figures point to pouring through the letters and the evidence of a book on i can or the hundreds of books on washington. my thought was, why not look at that person in it than the best, the first ladies? historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as they have largely ignored the role of -- in shaping the man. i suspect a lot of my colleagues tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians most historians is that we say were not educated in matters of the heart. so therefore canon's crowns and kings are what folks focus on. in setting the first lady's for example the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days on the south side of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he missed her. she was pregnant and she had a miscarriage. he missed her and he boug
neil barofsky talks about his book, bail out an inside account of how washington amended main street while rescuing wall street. he argues that the 700 billion-dollar troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. bailout fund was mishandled. it's about 40 minutes. >> joining us now is neil barofsky, former inspector general for t.a.r.p.. you saw him earlier on the panel. here's the cover of his bestseller. it's called bailout. .. >> i was nominated by my boss, and it was this crazy whirlwind when i had that conversation and was serving. >> what was the date he that you started? >> december 15, 2008. >> what are your politics? you the bush administration, essentially, but what are your politics? >> i have been a lifelong democrat. since i was old enough to go. vote. i have always been a registered democrat. it is actually kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approach me and asked me if i was interested in the job, i was going to different excuses as to why didn't want to go to washington. i was very happy being with a prosecutor. i was getting married. finally, when all those argu
service in the american revolution. he was a general of engineers under george washington and his many of you know, he designed the fortifications at west point. his payment was very long delayed and he finally got it in 1795 your in philadelphia he watches his good friend jefferson, and said would you write a will with me? and he may jefferson the executor. and after they drafted the formal, before they drafted a formal document, he had written something out in his own hand, and i would like to read this to you in conclusion. i bade mr. jefferson that in case i should die without will he should buy out of my money many negroes and free them. that remaining sons should be sufficient to give them education and provide for their means. that is to say, each should know beforehand the duty of a citizen in the free government, that he must defend his country against foreign as well as internal enemies, to have good and human hearts, sensible to the sufferings of others. each one must be married and have 100 acres of land with instruments, cattle for tillage and not to manage and govern as w
nobel prize winners among us 21 authors. .. >> if you want to mess with washington, d.c., go ahead. that's absolutely fine. but -- [laughter] but i've been living in washington, d.c. for a long time and watching policy debates go on. and i've never seen a president that was as down in the weeds secretly as president bush is. and i just wanted to start with a little anecdote that, actually, i think the 4% solution was visible back then, but way long, long ago in the early years of president bush's administration, he called a bunch of nobel prize-winning economists into the white house to meet x it was my very first time seeing president bush, and i think it was the roosevelt room, it might have been. and i was very nervous, of course, and i wondered what the heck am i doing amongst all these great economistses, and then i wondered what president bush was like. and right at the beginning of the meeting he started requesting questions that had been bugging him about moral hazard of very technological issue. when he came up to washington, he was a policy wonk too. and that's why the bush ins
more likely every hour. washington's willingness to take america to the brink threatens its prosperity. this is about the latest movement in the negotiation between the democrats and republicans comes down to useless symbolic moves and haggling between grown men. your elected officials are wasting time while the clock ticks. house speaker john boehner announced his plan b to let bush-era tax cuts expire for earners making more than $1 million a year and he wants to set automatic spending cuts with unspecified cuts elsewhere. the speaker pulled his so-called plan b for lack of support from his own party because many republicans still beholden to grover nor quest and the ridiculous pledge want no compromise at all. the debate between the two sides centers around a balanced approach the budget. republicans say president obama wants too much revenue. that's taxes in normal speak and not enough cuts. >> at some point we're going to have to address the spending problem that we have. we can't cut our way to prosperity. we need economic growth. many believe the fundamental reform of our tax co
for watching "state of the union." have a safe holiday season. i'm candy crowley in washington. head to for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choic
at georgetown university and columnist for "the washington post." welcome to you all. kim has put together a short video reminder of what happened in 2012. >> a wave of mass shootings renewed age-old theological discussions about evil, suffering and tragedy. especially after the massacre at the connecticut elementary school, many religious leaders repeated calls for stricter gun control measures. some called it a pro-life issue. one of the mass shootings took place in a house of worship. in august, six people were killed when a gunman opened fire at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. once again, religion played an important role in the presidential election. for the first time ever, there were no white protestants on either ticket. although there wasn't a lot of god talk from president obama or mitt romney, grassroots religious groups were active on both sides. evangelical voters were divided during the primary season, but in the end, they rallied around romney, despite some concerns about voting for a mormon candidate. still, their support didn't put him over the top. obama narrowly w
eisenhower. he's introduced by susan eisenhower, granddaughter at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> what an honor and treat to be at the eisenhower institute and especially an honor to have susan introduced me. you know, families can be a little touchy about the great man and their family, but the eisenhower's were amazing with me. john, susan, david are completely open, not defensive, which is unusual. incredibly helpful and i could not have done this book without them. so thank you, susan. six weeks after dwight eisenhower became president, stalin died. paik caught together top advisers and officials in that, what's the plan? .. is >> little bit like colonel sanders of kentucky fried chicken. was clearly a figure. ike was rooting for the general, the head of the red army was ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower sent his son john out to do a little spying. john seidel up to him. things are not as they seem. president eisenhower did not find out who was really in charge until the fifth day of the conference, when ik
eisenhower the granddaughter of the dwight eisenhower at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c.. this is about 50 minutes. .. >> the answer was there is no plan. i blew up, not for the first or last time, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier o
& prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of begin the conversation is to say the rich have always been with us, after all. and, actually, that's not true. and one of the points, really the starting point of my book is to say, actually, things are different now. and we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that income inequality has grown hugely in the united states and in the western industrialized world and, indeed, around the world and that a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? okay. i'm so short, i have to move the mic. a lot of the action is at the very, very top of the income distribution. so to just give you a quick sense
of the things that government does. simplify the tax code for tax complexity has washington revolves around it. they lose the power for the brainpower to doing productive things. and so yes, the thing to remember about spending if the money doesn't come from the head. it comes from you. you spit it out to politically favored constituent groups. that's not stimulus, more like waste. >> host: just go back to your original point, would you like to see no floating currencies. we had it for 180 years. it provides stability and value is 60 minutes, 16 ounces in a pound. so it doesn't restrict money supplied to have a vibrant economy of blossoms. a stagnant economy stays stagnant. what it means is if you make a contract to years from now that a fixed amount of dollars from the value of the dollar to years of the same messages today. when you make an investment company you are in effect when you value that investment is the future stream of income and net present value. so if your facebook shoes because you think it's going to pretend times in the next five years, you don't know what the dollars going
of time life looks, writes regularly for "the washington post" and our web site is rachel -- >> rachel as cox. >> rachel s., sorry about that, and this is her first book, "into dust and fire" five young americans who went to fight the nazi army. this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about a programming this weekend. you can tweet us of booktv. >> this is the cover of john goodman's newest book called "priceless" curing the health care crisis. booktv is some acacia net freedomfest in las vegas and dr. john goodman joins us now to talk about "priceless." dr. goodman lets start by asking you about the recent supreme court decision on the health care bill. what is your view of? >> i was sorry to see that decision. i wish the court had thrown out upon the care and we could start over and have a more rational health care reform. now we are going to have to deal with the law as it is and i think though even the supporters of the law are going to want to make major changes within and next year and to have. >> okay, let's start. what do you see as rationa
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)